Village Dogs With Chital Kill, Nagarahole

Harsha J
Harsha J
Two village dogs resting after bringing down a chital.

Chosen as 'Picture of the Week'

In India most wildlife reserves have large human settlements both within and on the periphery. Dog populations in these settlements travel into wildlife habitat, increasing the potential for pathogen transmission to wildlife.

This image was taken in the Kabini backwaters inside Nagarahole National Park. The two dogs (one in the top left of the frame) managed to bring down a fully grown chital hind. The dogs were possibly from a neighboring village adjoining the park. In addition to posing as competition to wild carnivores, village dogs are known reservoirs of epidemic-causing infectious pathogens of many wild carnivores.

In most developing countries like India, dog populations are large, unowned, unvaccinated and often free-ranging. ƒ In India most wildlife reserves have large human settlements both within and on the periphery. Dog populations in these settlements travel into wildlife habitat, increasing the potential for pathogen transmission to wildlife. Studies have shown that dogs harbour several diseases that can be deadly not only to humans (such as rabies) but to wild carnivore species (like tigers, leopards, foxes and wild dogs) as well. Dogs also transmit diseases such as canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine parvovirus (CPV).



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