Naga Wren-Babbler, Nagaland

by Arpit Deomurari
Arpit Deomurari

Chosen as 'Picture of the Week'

Due to splitting of the newly recognized species, the highly endemic populations of Naga Wren-Babbler are small enough to warrant uplisting to Near Threatened status, from the previous IUCN assessment of Least Concern.

Here is an image of the Naga Wren-Babbler or Long-tailed Wren-Babbler (Spelaeornis chocolatinus) which I photographed in Nagaland in Jan 2014.

This species is Near Threatened and dwells in montane broadleaf forest with thick undergrowth of Nagaland and North Manipur, in NE India. A very active species, usually foraging close to the ground, but not as exclusively ground-dwelling like the Pnoepyga Wren-Babblers.

Originally described as “Pnoepyga chocolatina” by Godwin-Austen and Walden in Ibis p.252, 1875, from Kedimai, Manipur, India. Many former subspecies of this bird have now been recognized as good/valid species, like Pale-throated Wren-babbler (S. kinneari), Chin Hills Wren-babbler (S. oatesi) and Grey-bellied Wren-babbler (S. reptatus). Due to splitting of the newly recognized species, the highly endemic populations of S. chocolatinus are small enough to warrant uplisting to Near Threatened status, from the previous IUCN assessment of Least Concern.

About the author

Arpit Deomurari
Arpit is a GIS and remote sensing expert at the Foundation for Ecological Security (FES). He is an expert on the birds of Gujarat and an accomplished wildlife photographer as well.


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